Hi in different languages writing a letter

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Hi in different languages writing a letter

But my evil, wicked, and very silly computer won't let me put the other fonts on this little spot. When I try, it substitutes little, empty boxes for the other letters, which is very aggravating.

So I'll just to describe them for you. If you like, you can contact me afterward and I'll give you my real e-mail and we'll give it another shot that way.

Natalie in Russian is Natalya. Their alphabet is called Cyrillic. The "n" looks like our H. The "a" is the same as ours. The "T" always looks like our capital "T" although it might be shorter, to make a small letter. Another "A" comes in.

Then the "L" is very different. You start off with a Roman numeral II. Then draw a straight line across the top to join the two posts. Then take that first line on the left and curl the bottom of it toward the left a little.

That's a Russian "L. Then they have one letter for the "ya. Now, in Greek letters, it's Natalia probably unless it's Attic Greek, which doesn't refer to a room at the top of the house, but to Attika, which is where Athens is.

The "n" or nu looks like our "V" and then the little "A" looks like the Christian fish symbol, kinda like an oval looking to the left, with his little fins off on the right. Then the "T" or tau is like in Russian -- it looks like our capital letter only very little, the size of the alpha.

Then the "L" or lambda is kinda like an upside-down "V" only one leg comes off the other one. The one on the left comes off the one on the right just a teensy ways from the point.

There's another alpha next. Then there's an iota, which is like a little "i" only without a dot, and it curves just slightly on the bottom to the right.

And another alpha at the end. Unless you're in Attika, like I said, in which case we need to put a different letter which is a long "e" which lots of ladies put on the end of their names in ancient times epsilonand it's like our "n" only the little leg on the right hangs down like the lower stem of our small "p.

I don't think I can describe how to write your name in Japanese kana, but that's also very neato-burrito, as is Korean. And I can't even do Chinese on my computer. It would probably seize up and explode if I tried! If I can resurrect my scanner someday, maybe I can give it a whirl.The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late ninth or early eighth century BC.

It is derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet, and was the first alphabetic script to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants. In Archaic and early Classical times, the Greek alphabet existed in many different local variants, but, by the end of the fourth century BC.

Read in another language; List of languages by writing system. This article may need to be rewritten entirely to comply with Wikipedia's quality standards. You can help. The discussion page may contain suggestions.

A (named / ˈ eɪ /, plural As, A's, as, a's or aes) is the first letter and the first vowel of the ISO basic Latin alphabet. It is similar to the Ancient Greek letter alpha, from which it derives. The uppercase version consists of the two slanting sides of a triangle, crossed in the middle by a horizontal bar. The lowercase version can be written in two forms: the double-storey a and single. Our website Linguanaut helps you say the alphabet in many languages, like how to say hello, welcome, thank you, other greetings and useful words and sentences in many languages. The modern Latin alphabet is used to write hundreds of different languages. Each language uses a slightly different set of letters, and they are pronounced in various ways. Some languages use the standard 26 letters, some use fewer, and others use more.

(February ) Below is a list of languages sorted by writing . The modern Latin alphabet is used to write hundreds of different languages. Each language uses a slightly different set of letters, and they are pronounced in various ways.

Some languages use the standard 26 letters, some use fewer, and others use more. Hello! Slide Show. World's Major Languages: To all of our new friends from all over the great big world!

hi in different languages writing a letter

Hellos listed alphabetically by language Learn to say several words and phrases in hundreds of different languages. For example - greetings in more than . Better Letters: Lesson Plans for Teaching Letter Writing Is letter writing a lost art?

This week Education World provides five new lessons to revive student interest in writing friendly letters.

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Feb 19,  · Each day our K-! class learns one word that means hello from a different country. Then we go around the group, shake hands and say it, one at a time. I wanted to show them your site on the Smartboard, but beside it, it says, "How to Use Chinese Curse Words and pfmlures.coms:

How to Say Hello in Different Languages (with Examples)